Nothing stays the same for long! Particularly when exploring the paths and tracks around Scotland. While researching and re-running routes for Scottish Trail Running I frequently found new paths appearing, old bridges disappearing, gates & signposts coming and going in equal measure. So while I expect the guidebook to give a good indication of great, runnable routes for a long time to come – I don’t expect those routes to stay exactly the same. Below are some updates to the described routes. If you know of any other route updates that would help fellow runners please get in touch using the contacts page or add a comment below. Thanks!

Route 54 – Lairig Ghru & Lairig an Laoigh

A good news story! On a recent (July 2015) run in the Cairngorms I discovered that the path faeries have replaced the rough and boggy trod between the Lairig Ghru and the Chalamain Gap with a gravel path. Huge white granite boulders line the path and are also set as stepping stones across streams. It is much easier running now – which is exactly what you need towards the end of a long run like this one.

Looking towards the Lairig Ghru from the Chalamain Gap in 2011

Looking towards the Lairig Ghru from the Chalamain Gap in 2011

Almost the same view - taken in 2015

Almost the same view – taken in 2015

Route 21 – Doughnot Hill

A helpful reader has been in touch (Jan 2015) to report that forestry operations have resulted in the track between the Greenland and Black Linn Reservoirs being resurfaced with rough, ankle-twisting hardcore. Given time, it will hopefully fill in and become a runnable surface but at the moment she reports that it is no fun at all. Therefore I suggest turning the run into an out & back along the grassy path described as the return path in the guidebook. Woodland Trust Scotland is currently working to establish a new native woodland just below the Lang Craigs and since the guidebook was published new paths have been constructed in the fields just beyond the woodland around Overtoun House. On exiting the woodland there is a fork. Both paths lead up the hill, the one on the right climbs more quickly & has steps.

Route 10 – Lamington

Runners may be interested to know that the Lamington run now gives an excellent opportunity to view some of Scotland’s onshore wind turbines up close & personal. The Clyde Wind Farm has been constructed in the hills which lie to the west of the route. Happily, access to the described trails is unaffected. At the very western end of the route there is now an alternative track (see photo) which runs parallel to the described path along the ridge-line between Whitelaw Brae and Hardrig Head. Thanks to Raph, Viv and Rik for this update.

The new track at Hardrig Head. The route described in Scottish Trail Running follows the path to the right of the ridge-line fence.

The new track at Hardrig Head. The route described in Scottish Trail Running follows the path to the right of the ridge-line fence.

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  1. Pingback: Route Updates page added to website | Scottish Trail Running

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